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4 Tech Skills Managers Should Have

4 Tech Skills Managers Should Have

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrust the workforce into virtual meetings and online collaboration almost overnight. And organizations have since realized that employees not only need to upskill for remote work, but also to drive growth and thrive in the next normal.


According to a recent PwC survey of HR leaders, more than 40% are planning to accelerate their organization’s digital tool transformation; one-third of HR executives also plan to offer training opportunities for their employees. Managers — and those who are aspiring to become managers — should lead the trend of learning new technical skills.

If you’re hoping to get promoted into a management position, technical skills give you an advantage because you’d be able to maximize technology in your new role. As a manager, you will be asked to train team members and guide everyone through their tasks; without technical knowledge, it would be very difficult to fulfill any managerial role. Here are four tech skills all aspiring managers should aim to cultivate:

Computer Know-How

computer know how
In a digital world, a competent manager should be able to handle computers. It’s a basic but crucial skill that enables them to write business plans, give presentations, and calculate budgets. Aside from being literate in productivity suites, managers should know how to connect to Wi-Fi, send emails, download files, and use video conferencing apps as well.

It’s also useful to have a basic understanding of concepts related to programming languages (HTML, CSS) and websites (web design and search engine optimization). In our IT Apprenticeships and Upskilling the Future IT Workforce’ post, we also emphasized the importance of knowing the basics of cybersecurity and cloud computing as well.

As IT plays a significant role in many operations, training on the basics with Tech901 can help future managers upskill with technology. Our Code 1.0 class and Web Programming class are great starting points for learning all about computer science.

Business Data Analytics

data analysis
As one Business2Community’s article discusses, data is the currency of the 21st century. Most businesses have created a space for themselves in the digital landscape, so it’s important for managers to be able to gather, consolidate, and analyze the data that comes their way.

Of course, data analytics can be a complex process. Fortunately, you can now upskill through digital education. You don’t necessarily need an intricate IT background for business data analytics, as Maryville University’s online MBA program points out, these business administration courses include training on specialized IT knowledge. This would include business data analytics, database principles and design, and agile analysis, to name a few. Indeed, no business degree today should be without data analytics for data-driven decision-making and planning.

A great manager who has a grasp of data analytics can measure performance accurately, identify trends or potential issues, and relay risks to upper management. They should also be able to use specific data collection and analytics software that is specific to their industry, in order to optimize business processes.

If you want a head start on data analytics so you can unlock your potential as a manager, our upcoming Data 1.0 course can shape you for that role. In the meantime, our IT Security course can help you understand what it takes to safeguard data and minimize potential risks surrounding it.

Project Management

project managment
Project management is the application of skills, understanding, tools, procedures, and processes to perform activities and achieve project goals. If an organization wants to improve performances, sales, customer relationships, or product quality, the manager must be able to help execute the projects well.

Managers have to be familiar with the tasks, milestones, and work breakdown in project management so they can allocate the resources needed to get the task completed on time and on budget. A Forbes article also highlights how strong project management skills help managers properly vet ideas so they weed out bad ones during the initiating phase. The upfront analysis of the pros and cons of a proposed project allows teams to have a clear understanding of the potential risks they may face.

Whether or not you’re aiming to become a manager, project management is a useful and necessary skill to have. The Tech901 IT Project course will teach you all about using communication, managing resources and stakeholders, and implementing schedules so you can effectively manage any technical or non-technical project from start to finish.

Financial Management

finacial managment
Every manager should know how to handle resources like money, people, machines, and time. Managers have to make arrangements to invest money or assign tasks to certain people. Alongside that, they should know how to adjust budgets, interpret financial reports, and understand pricing strategies.

Once the resources are allocated, managers would need to measure performance to calculate the return on investment. Lastly, having a background in financial management enables managers to have productive discussions with financial professionals and upper management.

Aspirational managers would have an edge if they’re familiar with the basics of financial management. Every introductory Tech901 course includes a financial counseling session to get you on the right track. Our IT Foundations class can guide you with finances, while giving you the confidence to implement the best IT practices — perfect for jumpstarting your career.

 

Article written by Ramona Jordan

Ramona Jordan is a freelance writer and consultant who is passionate about improving the workplace. She enjoys keeping up with the latest trends and best practices across different industries. She love to hike up the local trails on the weekends.

Exclusively for tech901.org

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